Reflection Blog post Studio 1, Week 4, moving master shot, actor and camera blocking and drama editing.

Hello, everyone.

welcome back to another reflective blog post in which I will talk about what I have learned during this weeks lecture.

This weeks lecture was about camera and actor blocking and how to achieve a good moving master shot. I have already known what a master shot is. But what I did not know was how much more I can do as a director to make my master shot more interesting and unique and easier to implement into a movie. Which is with camera movement. But in order to create a good moving master shot I have to think very clearly about where I want my actors to move and where I want my camera to be at what part of the scene. This takes a lot of planing and overwhelmed me at the beginning quite a bit.

Picture-Five-KMD

group

I honestly did not expect that a moving master shot would take so much effort, and we are just at the beginners stage.

I have also learned a lot about the thought process a Director has to go through when he thinks about creating a moving master shot. I have to think about what is the major criteria I want my master shot to focus on. In the lecture we have been told that a good moving master shot has all 5 of these criteria, which are:

  • Exposition: cover enough information to make the audience believe what happens next in the story.
  • Seamlessness: the scene flows easily and the audience does not get distracted by weird cuts or bad continuity etc.
  • Eye Candy: use of fore- and background to create a visually appealing shot as well as other techniques to make the shot look good.
  • Drama: showing expressions and reactions by cutting from closeup to closeup, depending on the situation
  • Coverage: pick up enough coverage to cover the whole scene. Actors, props, dialogue etc.

I did not think that a moving master shot requires to plan this much ahead. Before this lecture I would have done a master shot by letting my actors act out the scene and I film the scene from a tripod, maybe include a pan. But I would not have thought about the motivation I want my character to have to move to a specific position on the set. Neither would I have thought about the character movement influence the positioning of my camera.

I have learned a lot more about camera work and directing in this weeks class and this little overview was only a small part of the aspects of a moving master that we have covered and what I have learned and will still learn during this trimester.

I am very happy to have gotten so far and want to increase my knowledge even more and let you guys know about my progress.

For now that is all from me for this reflective post.

I really want to cover my experience as an International Student in Australia a lot more with you guys.

Planned are V-logs and a youtube show in the future.

I thank everyone who reads my blog a lot for your curiosity and your interest in this content and I hope you enjoy reading this blog.

 

Thank you very much and as always stay positive and keep smiling.

 

References:

Gif:
http://gph.is/18Iao6P

Camera Blocking picture: https://www.moviemaker.com/archives/moviemaking/directing/kill-me-deadly-low-budget-1940s-noir/

Actor Blocking picture:
https://cjpowersonline.com/2012/02/02/directors-stage-shots-and-block-actors-with-triangles/

 

 

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